How to Learn Anything

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Are you learning a new physical skill, undertaking new challenging mental concepts, or looking to hone an existing skill? Keep reading to find out how to accelerate your learning by creating a structure and using proven techniques. Soon you’ll be pushing boundaries you never knew existed.
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People are different. Every person’s brain is hardwired differently, and so is the way we take in, store, and then retrieve information. Therefore, it’s important you know how you learn best, so that you can capitalise on that and spend less time on the less effective methods!

Styles of learning can be grouped into 3 types: visual, auditory/verbal,or kinaesthetic/tactile. You can be mainly one type, or a combination of the three. Ask yourself some questions to help determine what type of learner you are:

1. Visual

If you answered yes to most of these questions, you will respond well to visual learning.

As a visual learner you prefer to SEE what you are learning and your brain stores information by the way it looks. Lessons are learned by watching demonstrations, and using visual aids to help understand topics.

Try watching explainer videos and presentations.

Try using visual aids to help you learn; graphs, chars, maps, and other diagrams will help.

Try using visual aids to help you learn; graphs, chars, maps, and other diagrams will help.

Try to visualize verbal instructions or things that are being read to you.

Write down key words, ideas, or instructions for better retention.

Use flashcards to reinforce lessons, concepts and new words.

Draw pictures to help explain new concepts and then explain the pictures.

Color code to group similar ideas together and underscore important concepts.

2. Auditory/Verbal

If you answered yes to most of these questions, you will respond well to auditory/verbal learning.

As a auditory learner you prefer to HEAR what you are learning and your brain stores information by the way it sounds. Lessons are learned by listening and repeating notes back out loud.

Try reading reputable material online, in books, or e-books.

Try listening to podcasts, lectures, or discussions with experts.

Study in groups so that you may talk out loud and explain your ideas to other individuals.

Use flashcards and read them out loud to reinforce lessons, concepts and new words.

Record yourself spelling words and then listen to the recording.

Ask questions and engage in conversational discussion to learn new the material.

Record lectures and lessons in order to play back and listen multiple times as a study technique.

3. Kinaesthetic/Tactile

If you answered yes to most of these questions, you will respond well to kinaesthetic/tactile learning.

Learning is best when it is HANDS-ON or involves physical activity. Lessons are best learned through touching, building, moving, or drawing rather than lectures and reading.

Study in groups and incorporate in activities that involve building, drawing or acting out.

To reinforce new material learned, try teaching it to your friends or family.

For better concentration, try chewing gum, walking around, or rock in a chair while reading or studying. Use flashcards and arrange them in groups to help demonstrate relationships between ideas.

Take frequent breaks by getting up and stretching and walking around to help get your circulation flowing. Find a mentor who you can learn from, and get some hands on experience. If your mentor can offer you demonstrations of the skill being performed, this can be invaluable and will save you hours of trial and error as you’ll instantly have an idea of what you should be doing.